Q&A with Vic DePhillips: Flooring

 

Q&A with Vic DePhillips: Flooring

 
 

Q: How do we square up and straighten our floors compared to what other manufacturers might do?
 
A: Unlike most others in the business I do not believe in squaring in the jig. We lay out both perimeter bands on the assembly table making certain that both are the same exact length.
Once the entire floor has been framed and nailed up, we move the floor over to the decking area. I do not believe that we should take the time to square on the jig, considering that framing takes more time than squaring does, and it is also very difficult to move the raw frame keeping square unless it is decked.
Instead, we take the floor frame over the decking area, run a dry line down the far side of the floor indexing it 1 ½” along the line to make certain that the floor is straight and then run our diagonals square. Generally 1/8″ is accepted as square.
Next we put on the first row of decking securing everything in the field but not the end bands. Check the floor for square once again and then put on the successive rows of decking.

 

Q:  We sandwich the OSB between the rim boards in the floors, do others?
 
A:  I believe we are unique in our application of the OSB in our floor boards. We do this for a few reasons.
  1. I believe that it helps to stiffen the bands which add to shipping strength.
  2. We can replace the OSB with ½” steel flitch plate without changing the dimension of the floor joists, when the engineering calculations require it.
 

Q: What type of glue do we use, between the joists and the subfloor sheathing?                        
 
A:  I have tried most adhesives in my brief time in this business. Liquid Nails and products like that have all for one reason or the other not worked. Some film over too quickly and don’t hold as well as what we use now.
     I found this material about 18 years ago. It is delivered to the joists at about 180 degrees and is air activated, which means it will not film over. By air activated I mean that once the Plywood/OSB hits the glue it activates, spreads out over the joist and starts to set. Full set time on the material is 24 hours to full strength.  

 

Q: Are we the only ones that do our rough plumbing in the manner in which we do?
 
A:  If you are referring to plumbing at the start of the assembly line and getting it out of our way early, I believe we are. My experience told me that trying to get the under-floor all done at the end of the line was the wrong sequence. It held up production and left too much for the end of the line.
 
It also allows us to fill our DWV (Drain, Waste and Vent) in mid line to check for leaks. I believe we are unique in that process.
We just added a new process whereby we put water in all our tubs and showers after the traps have been installed to test the traps.